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    31-10-2013

    UNESCO launches social media discussion page for the Freedom of Expression Toolkit

    © UNESCO

    In conjunction with the 8th Youth Forum, UNESCO is launching a discussion group on the popular social networking site, Facebook, for the recently released “Freedom of Expression Toolkit: A Guide for Students”. Users of the toolkit could use the hashtag #FoEToolkit to participate in the discussion stream.

    The Freedom of Expression Toolkit is a tool to raise awareness among young people on the crucial issue that is freedom of expression. While many toolkits already exist, none so far have been written in an accessible language, directly targeting youth.

    The toolkit explores and discusses the following questions:

    • What is freedom of expression?
    • Why does freedom of expression matter?
    • When is freedom of expression at risk?
    • What are the conditions needed for freedom of expression to flourish?
    • What are the special roles of journalists in freedom of expression?
    • What about freedom of expression online?
    • What are the limitations of freedom of expression?

    The Toolkit presents and explains the different concepts related to freedom of expression and complements these explanations with concrete examples and case studies. It also contains various hands-on activities which the readers can participate in.

    With this Toolkit, UNESCO aims to raise awareness on the topic of freedom of expression among the youth worldwide in the various practical activities, such as setting up a model press council, creating a blog, monitoring the news, celebrating World Press Freedom Day, or creating their own case-studies looking at their community or country. UNESCO hopes to gather information from schools and youth groups around the world on how they are using the toolkit, and to foster dialogue process among those various groups via social media on the topic of freedom of expression.

    The Toolkit is currently available online in English and Spanish. Arabic, French and Chinese versions are coming soon. The English version of the Toolkit is also available in a tablet computer-compatible HTML 5 version.

    From 29 to 31 October 2013 young men and women from countries all over the world gathered at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris for the 8th Youth Forum. This year’s theme is “Youth and Social Inclusion: Civic Engagement, Dialogue and Skills Development”. The Forum’s objective is to engage the youth delegations in formulating and reviewing policy on the topics of capacity development for the transition to adulthood, civic engagement, democratic participation and social innovation. The conclusions and recommendations of the Youth Forum will be submitted to the UNESCO General Conference starting on 5 November.

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    31-10-2013

    UNESCO charting the course of Global Citizenship Education (GCE)

    © UNESCO

    In a globalized world, it is imperative that learners acquire, not only cognitive knowledge and skills, but also values, attitudes and communication skills as a critical complement. This was one of the major conclusions of the Technical Consultation on Global Citizenship Education (GCE) that was organized by UNESCO and the Republic of Korea in Seoul on 9-10 September 2013.

    The Consultation also clarified common perspectives on the following questions:

    • What is global citizenship education?
    • Why support global citizenship and global citizenship education now?
    • What needs to be done at the global level to support and promote global citizenship education?

    Building on the consensus achieved at the Seoul meeting, a second consultation will be held on the subject with a larger group of stakeholders in Bangkok (Thailand) from 2 to 4 December 2013: the First International UNESCO Forum on Global Citizenship Education.  

    The Forum, organized in support of the Global Education First Initiative, will dive deeper into the subject matter by exploring the implications of this emerging perspective in the areas of policy, research and practice, outreach and partnership building with all categories of constituencies (government, development partners, civil society, research and academia). Innovations and latest trends in this new field will also be highlighted, discussed and documented. Finally, it is expected that the Forum will provide participants with the opportunity to expand their networks, share their experiences and ideas, and develop and prioritize actions for supporting greater implementation of GCE at the country level.

    LINKS

    The outcome document of the Consultation - "Global Citizenship Education: An Emerging Perspective" (PDF)

    Education for the 21st Century

    For more information, please contact gce(at)unesco.org

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    31-10-2013

    Academy united to investigate media development in Uruguay

    The Project Media Development Study in Uruguay: Diagnosis, Prospects and Challenges will be launched today at the event, which will be attended by representatives of UNESCO’s Montevideo Office, the project research team and Advisory Board composed of national institutions.

    An unprecedented work has been undertaken since 2010. All national universities offering careers in communication sciences have successfully integrated this initiative: University of the Republic (UDELAR), Universidad del Trabajo del Uruguay (UTU), Catholic University of Uruguay (UCU) through its UNESCO Chair, University of Montevideo (UM) and Universidad ORT Uruguay, also joined by the Faculty of Social Sciences (UDELAR) through ObservaTIC.

    Coordinated by UNESCO as part of its International Programme for the Development of Communication (IPDC), Uruguayan institutions will locally implement UNESCO’s Media Development Indicators (MDIs), adopted by the IPDC Intergovernmental Council at its 26th session in 2008.

    According to this initiative, the Uruguayan academy will adapt the MDIs tool to the Uruguayan scenario and apply the indicators in close cooperation with various actors of the media system of the country.

    Research categories to be addressed include: the regulatory system, plurality and diversity of media, equal conditions and transparency of ownership, the media as a platform for democratic discourse, professional training and institutions in support to freedom of expression, and infrastructure capacity.

    The project, which execution is planned for 2014 will receive funding from the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), UNESCO and all the universities involved.

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    31-10-2013

    UNESCO Director-General deplores murder of Iraqi journalist Bashar al-Nuaimi

    UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova today denounced the murder of Iraqi television journalist Bashar al-Nuaimi, who was gunned down in Mosul, in northern Iraq on 24 October.

    “I deplore the murder of Bashar al-Nuaimi” said Irina Bokova. “He is the third media profession to lose his life in Iraq during the month of October. This situation is very alarming. Media professionals must be able to carry out their professional duties without fearing for their lives. I count on the authorities to do everything in their power to ensure that these crimes do not go unpunished.”

                Bashar al-Nuaimi worked for the Al-Mousilya television channel. According to the Committee for the Protection of Journalists, the channel regularly broadcast reports on local affairs. Bashar Al-Nuaimi was killed by unidentified attackers on 24 October near his home in the Al-Nabi Sheet neighbourhood of Mosul.

                He is the fourth Iraqi journalist whose murder has been condemned by UNESCO this year, and is remembered on the dedicated web page “UNESCO Condemns Killing of Journalists”.

     

    ****

    Media contact: Sylvie Coudray

    Tel: +33 (0)1 45 68 42 12

    s.coudray(at)unesco.org

     

     

    UNESCO is the United Nations agency with a mandate to defend freedom of expression and press freedom. Article 1 of its Constitution requires the Organization to “further universal respect for justice, for the rule of law and for the human rights and fundamental freedoms which are affirmed for the peoples of the world, without distinction of race, sex, language or religion, by the Charter of the United Nations.” To realize this the Organization is requested to “collaborate in the work of advancing the mutual knowledge and understanding of peoples, through all means of mass communication and to that end recommend such international agreements as may be necessary to promote the free flow of ideas by word and image…”

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    31-10-2013

    Doha: Director-General Discusses Stakes of Educating at the Extreme

    One year after the launch of the Educate a Child initiative by Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova joined key partners at the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) in Doha on 30 October to take stock and single out priorities to achieve universal primary education by 2015.

    Entitled “Educating at the Extreme,” the plenary panel brought together Her Highness Sheikha Moza, UN Special Envoy for Global Education Gordon Brown, UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake, UN High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres; UNRWA Commissioner-General Filippo Grandi, the State Secretary from Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, Mr Hans Jurgen Beerfeltz, and the Director-General.

    The discussions focused on strategies for global resource mobilization, protecting education in emergencies and the need to take into account linguistic and cultural diversity to reach marginalized children.

    Her Highness Sheikha Moza underlined the success of multisectoral approaches and the need for more sensitivity to cultural identities.

    “We have to match the commitment to education with a cultural commitment; we have to give confidence to learners that their heritage and culture will not be lost.”

    Drawing attention to the thousands of endangered languages worldwide, the Director-General highlighted that learning in mother tongue at primary level has proven benefits, noting that “sensitivity to cultural diversity and linguistic diversity is a way to reach the marginalized and must be part of the post-2015 education agenda. ”

    Asked to comment on prevailing data gaps on the hardest to reach children, Ms Bokova noted the importance of governments conducting self-assessments in the lead up to 2015 in order to set the right policies, insisting that governments must be held responsible for education.

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    30-10-2013

    Close up … with Signmark at the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum

    © UNESCO

    Signmark (a.k.a Marko Vuoriheimo) is the first deaf artist in the world to get a record deal with an international music label. Born deaf into a world where music is for the hearing, Signmark pursued his childhood dream, and in 2006, released the world's first sign language hip-hop DVD. His mission is to change attitudes towards the deaf and highlight the rights of disabled and minority groups through his music, and he has performed across the world, including an unforgettable concert in Paris at the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum.

    We caught up with him to ask him a few questions.

    You’ve realized your dreams through music, but it must have taken a lot of strength and perseverance to get where you are now. What advice would you have for a young person who feels overwhelmed by the difficulties they face in following their own dreams?

    It's all about your attitude. Whatever you want, if you really want it, just work hard! And don't waste your time on those people who don’t believe your dream. I’ve got friends who really believe in me and understand what I want. Without them I wouldn’t be here now. If you fail or make a mistake – don't get upset! Instead think, "Perfect, I’ve failed!", because the more mistakes you make, the stronger it makes you!

    You have performed in over 30 countries and your music has touched people, deaf and hearing, all over the world. What are some of your favourite moments, when you have felt that you are really making a difference to the lives of other deaf youths?

    My favourite moments are when I see both deaf and hearing people coming to see my show. Multiculturalism is my favourite thing. People need to come over and see. Then maybe they will get a "wow" experience during the show; as I said in one of my songs, "actions speak louder than words".

    Also I love the feeling when young people tell me "I will be better than you!" That’s perfect, because if they’ve got motivation, they’ve got the key to making their dreams come true. That's why I’m doing this work.

    Music is a powerful tool for uniting people and sending a message. What made you want to go into the music business in the first place?

    I didn't plan to go into the music business; it was just a hobby. But when I wrote my first song, I knew that I wanted be an international artist. That's why my stage name is in English: Signmark, even though I wrote my first songs in Finnish. When my first album was ready and not a single record label took it, I didn't give up. I decided to borrow money from my family and make my own album! Then I started learning about the music business.

    Your concert at UNESCO will be a symbol of hope to many. What messages do you wish to give to young people when you perform?

    Anything is possible. If I, as a deaf person, have made impossible things become possible, why can’t you do same? We have new songs to show you all in UNESCO. It’s going to be hot!

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    30-10-2013

    Close up … with Nick d’Aloisio at the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum

    © UNESCO

    17 year old Nick d’Aloisio is a British-born Australian entrepreneur whose skill, creativity and enthusiasm for computer programming have taken him to remarkable heights. His innovative mobile application, Summly, condenses long texts into short, accessible summaries, and was sold to Yahoo in 2013 for $30 million, making Nick the youngest self-made millionaire in history.

    We caught up with him at the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum…

    What advice do you have for young people, sitting in their bedrooms right now with nothing to do but an idea?

    I would say first off, just be curious. If it’s a technology-related idea, start Googling it, and get free reference materials online that can teach you slightly more about it. The internet is great for self-learning - you can teach yourself anything. Get to grips with the technology at hand - just try it and see what happens!

    You recently called for skills like entrepreneurship to be taught in schools. What else do you think we can do to better prepare young people for life?

    The idea that “it’s OK to fail”. When I was in school, “It’s okay to take a risk even if it doesn’t pay off” wasn’t communicated that much. In entrepreneurship the odds of failing are extremely high, but that’s a good thing because failing is an opportunity to learn from your mistakes and to get it right the next time. So many more people would try new things if they become OK with the prospect of failing.

    Your app Summly is about cutting down long articles to concise summaries. It makes us think of a reproach often made about young people – that they have short attention spans, making entrepreneurship unlikely. What are your thoughts here?

    Because of the information deluge streaming into mobile devices and on the internet, everyone has a short attention span now, not just young people. People are finding it very difficult to find what they’re interested in so they skip from one thing to another. It’s also about immediacy. People want instant gratification for clear information – at the very second they refresh their feeds.

    Tell us about the projects you’re currently working on ...

    I am not done with summarization yet. I think you could take the idea of summarization to another level, beyond text - so how about visual summarization? Use videos, images – an image can speak a thousand words!

    What’s your message for young people today to encourage them to achieve their dreams?

    To each young individual, I’d say: “Don’t be afraid, you can do anything now with internet and with communication.” To young people as a collective group, I’d say: “Encourage each other.” For example, I found it lonely to launch my own company - I was the sole founder and everyone else in my team is older than me. If you have a mate who’s really interested in what you do, collaborate and help each other out along the way. It really does have help to have one or two other people your age who have the same interests. You guys can learn together and reach for your dreams as one.

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    30-10-2013

    UNESCO Youth Forum: Speak up, speak out!

    © UNESCO
    When, local time: 
    Wednesday, 30 October 2013 - 5:45pm

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    30-10-2013

    UNESCO Roadmap for Long Term Access to Digital Heritage

    As a continuation of the implementation of the outcomes of the conference “Memory of the World in the Digital Age: Digitization and Preservation” (Vancouver, 26 to 28 September 2012), the National Archives and the Royal Library of the Netherlands will host the inaugural meeting of the UNESCO Digital Roadmap project. The meeting will be held on 5 and 6 December 2013 in The Hague, where experts from various backgrounds will introduce current and future challenges facing heritage institutions worldwide in providing reliable long-term access to digital information.

    This initiative was one of the recommendations formulated in the UNESCO/UBC Vancouver Declaration which mentions the:

      pressing need to establish a roadmap proposing solutions, agreements and policies that ensure long term access and trustworthy preservation. This roadmap should address issues like open government, open data, open access and electronic government. It should dovetail with national and international priorities and be in full agreement with human rights.

    Although the 2003 UNESCO Charter for the Preservation of the Digital Heritage recommended that partners from the heritage sector, government and industry should cooperate and learn to understand each other's position, it seems that little solid progress has been made. Projects and conferences abound, but it has proved to be very difficult to bring the major players from these three sectors together. In The Hague, discussion will focus on inaugurating a platform where this will be possible, and where cooperation on shared issues will help to bridge the divides between state and non-state, as well as between profit and not-for-profit.

    High level representatives from UNESCO, the European Union and the Netherlands Ministry of Education, Culture and Science will react to the issues raised by the experts from the point of view of government. The heritage sector will be represented by the President of the International Council of Archives (ICA) and by the former President of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA). Global companies, including Microsoft and Google that participated in the Vancouver Memory of the World Conference, have been asked to represent industry. The programme will be posted online at a later date.

    The meeting on Thursday afternoon is open to the public. Participation is free, but as the number of places is limited, registration is necessary. This should be done through email to scunesco(at)unesco.nl with “UNESCO Digital Roadmap” in the email header and the name, professional affiliation, address and telephone number in the body text.

    The meeting is organized by The Netherlands National Commission for UNESCO, ICA, IFLA, UNESCO, The Netherlands Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, DEN Foundation, National Library of the Netherlands, Netherlands National Archives and LIBER.

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    30-10-2013

    The Director-General is taking part in the annual World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE)

    © UNESCO

    The Summit is organized in Doha, on 29-31 October 2013, under the theme ‘Reinventing Education for Life.’ This forum offers a unique opportunity for participants from over 100 countries to explore and share cutting-edge practices in education, to dialogue and network and to take an active part in building the future of education.

    On 31 October, the Director-general will address the joint WISE-UNESCO Special Plenary Session ‘Education Challenges in a Changing World’. This Special Plenary Session is intended to broaden the current debates on education in the post-2015 international development framework and to help shape the vision of the future of learning. This will be done by exploring how a humanistic and integrated vision of lifelong learning may be best reflected in the global education agenda.

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    30-10-2013

    UNESCO Director-General deplores murder of Honduran cameraman Manuel Murillo Varela

    UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova today denounced the murder of cameraman Manuel Murillo Varela, found shot dead on 24 October in the capital city of Tegucigalpa.

    “I deplore the murder or Manuel Murillo Varela,” said the Director-General. “Such acts must not go unpunished. I urge the authorities to thoroughly investigate this crime and bring the perpetrators to justice.”

    Manuel Murillo Varela, 32, worked as an official cameraman for several public figures and, more recently, for TV Globo. According to IFEX, an NGO defending freedom of expression, he had been kidnapped and tortured in 2010 by men searching for some of his video footage. Since then, the authorities had provided him with special protection.

    Manuel Murillo Varela is the 8th Honduran journalist whose death has been condemned by UNESCO since 2012. He is remembered on the dedicated web page page UNESCO Condemns Killing of Journalists.

                                                          ****

                                          Media contact: Sylvie Coudray

                                             Tel: +33 (0)1 45 68 42 12

                                                  s.coudray(at)unesco.org


    UNESCO is the United Nations agency with a mandate to defend freedom of expression and press freedom. Article 1 of its Constitution requires the Organization to “further universal respect for justice, for the rule of law and for the human rights and fundamental freedoms which are affirmed for the peoples of the world, without distinction of race, sex, language or religion, by the Charter of the United Nations.” To realize this the Organization is requested to “collaborate in the work of advancing the mutual knowledge and understanding of peoples, through all means of mass communication and to that end recommend such international agreements as may be necessary to promote the free flow of ideas by word and image…”

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    29-10-2013

    UNESCO empowers indigenous women in Central America through ICT

    © UNESCO

    “Fear” was the word used often by women from Ngöbe-Buglé indigenous community in Costa Rica when they talked about their first experience in front of a microphone, computer or video-camera. Even more crippling than fear to speak in public or ask someone a question is a profound belief that a woman’s role should be limited to taking care of children and homes.

    The exercise which solicited ideas for radio stories about Ngöbe-Buglé home-makers revealed that, although women practice traditional cooking, handicrafts and medicine on a daily basis, they do not consider themselves as guardians of traditions. Usually this role is reserved to sukia, a healer in indigenous societies across Central America. On their way to the knowledge society, Ngöbe-Buglé, Sutiaba, Nahoas-Nicarao, Chorotegas-Nahuas-Mangues y Cacaopera-Matagalpa and Guna communities have to count with illiteracy, unemployment and poverty. High rate of teenage pregnancies affects the number of girls continuing their studies.

    To organize a series of workshops on ICTs, radio and video for women from indigenous communities in Costa Rica, Panama and Nicaragua, UNESCO partnered with the Sustainable Development Network (RDS) NGO and the Indigenous Movement of Nicaragua, as well as Centre for Social Development Studies (CEDES) NGO in Panama. From July to October 2013, the workshops were taking place in San Felix, Chiriqui province in Panama; La Casona, Punta Arenas province in Costa Rica; and in Managua for participants from Pacific, Centre and North regions of Nicaragua.

    After theoretical and practical courses, women recorded and edited stories about traditions, legends, cosmology as well as everyday community life. In the Rural College of La Casona, trainees scripted, played, filmed and edited socially-important messages. In Nicaragua, training yielded 12 audiovisual products and 20 radio and audiovisual pieces in Panama and Costa Rica. More than 75 women, mostly mistresses of families, acquired a combined set of competencies (knowledge, skills and attitude), graduating from users of mobile phones to potential producers of information and media content, who can make their voice heard. More workshops and exchange meetings are planned until December 2013.

    UNESCO will continue strengthening communication capacities of indigenous communities, in particular women, with objective of introducing audiovisual content generated by the communities into media at provincial and national levels.

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    29-10-2013

    UNESCO unveils guidebook for climate change journalism in Africa

    Twenty-three African experts, including academics and journalists, took time to review a manuscript for a forthcoming UNESCO publication entitled “Reporting on Climate Change in Africa: A Practical Guide for Journalists”. Held from 22 to 23 October at the UN Complex in Gigiri, Kenya, the guide is aimed primarily at helping journalists to acquire knowledge and skills on how to better report on the multifaceted subject of climate change in Africa.

    More importantly, as Fackson Banda, programme specialist at UNESCO Headquarters, put it in his welcome remarks, “The publication is meant to contribute towards developing transnational and interdisciplinary climate literacy among media professionals and especially journalists, in an attempt to demystify efforts at climate change mitigation and adaptation”.

    The workshop brought together various African experts from Botswana, Ghana, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Co-authored by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) and INTERNEWS, the manuscript stimulated intense debate focused on the “interdisciplinary” basis of climate change knowledge, and how it could be appropriated by journalists in the “African” context.

    Speaking as a journalism educator, Emily Brown, Head of the Media Technology Department of the Polytechnic of Namibia, insisted on the need to underscore truthfulness when reporting on climate change. She added that it was important for news stories to have meaning so as to arouse the readers’ interest. Citing a content-analytical study she carried out, she further highlighted how the media in Namibia tended to bury climate change and environmental stories in the back pages, saying there was need for journalists to actively set the agenda on climate change adaptation and mitigation.

    Bonny Alams, contributing to the discussion as a Nigerian journalist, noted: “For us to achieve [such] reportage, we must work to change people’s perception of the daily consumption of what Nigerians refer to us ‘juicy’ stories that revolve under political, economic and social life”.

    For his part, drawing on what he called “the African worldview”, Prof. Workineh Kelbessa of Addis Ababa University challenged the authors to take into account issues of ethics and environmental justice as part of the interdisciplinary core of climate change journalism, emphasizing the need to correlate the environment and humanity. He added that the manuscript needed to reflect a better link between indigenous knowledge and science.

    The participants also agreed that radio was an important vehicle in the struggle to better report on climate change in Africa. They thus called upon UNESCO and the authors to ensure that the publication addressed aspects that would make it more usable by radio journalists.

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    29-10-2013

    Director-General’s call to youth everywhere: “Take control. Speak up and speak out”

    © UNESCO

    On 29 October 2013, the UNESCO Director-General, Irina Bokova opened the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum, which will take place from 29 to 31 October 2013 at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris, France.

    The Youth Forum brings together 500 young women and men from over 150 countries, in order to exchange views, to share experiences, to reflect together and to identify common concerns and problems.

    “The world needs your ideas, your vision more than ever before,” stated the Director-General “You are not the subjects of change – you are its greatest leaders.”

    In her address, Irina Bokova appealed to all Youth Forum delegates:

    “Take control. Speak up and speak out. Be bold and be audacious.”

    The 8th UNESCO Youth Forum will be more interactive than previous editions, and focus on supporting concrete projects. Delegates will be invited to identify 15 Action Projects (three per region), from amongst 45 projects shortlisted by an international jury, as a result of a call by UNESCO to youth organizations from around the world in July and August.

    The Youth Forum will feature also a range of interactive workshops and side events, including also the award ceremony for the UNESCO / Juan Bosch Prize for the Promotion of Social Science Research in Latin America and the Caribbean, presented by the Director-General to the young researcher Karen Nathalia Cerón Steevens from Columbia. In addition, the Youth Forum will hold a concert by the Finnish sign language rap artist "Signmark".

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    29-10-2013

    School students get chance to act as archaeologist at Thang Long Imperial Citadel(Viet Nam)

    Country: 

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    29-10-2013

    YouthMobile Workshop at 8th UNESCO Youth Forum

    © UNESCO

    UNESCO Knowledge Societies Division is organizing a comprehensive presentation on the new YouthMobile Initiative at the 2013 UNESCO Youth Forum on Thursday, 31 October at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris, France. The YouthMobile Initiative aims to directly engage young people to develop mobile applications for sustainable development and employment. The YouthMobile presentation will focus on the global mobile phone phenomenon including the latest mobile technologies and mobile applications that have had a huge global impact on youth worldwide.

    The UNESCO YouthMobile Initiative attempts to answer the question: How can we give next 1 billion young people with new Internet-connected mobile phones the skills and the confidence to develop dynamic mobile applications (or apps) that resolve issues of sustainable development and youth employment?

    The YouthMobile Initiative builds on the experience of many worldwide initiatives that introduce young people to computer science programming (learning-to-code) and problem solving (coding-to-learn).

    It also seeks to build on experiences targeting young women who are vastly underrepresented in this field.

    Finally it builds on the consideration that for millions of young people, the smartphone in their pocket is a very powerful computer, it will be their only computer, and they use it for nearly every aspect of their lives: communicating, learning, taking pictures and playing games.

    The YouthMobile presentation will be delivered by Ms Dorothy Gordon, Director-General of the Ghana-India Kofi Annan Centre of Excellence in ICT.

    Dorothy is a specialist in international development with over 20 years’ experience in working throughout Africa, US, Europe and Asia in executive and consulting positions.

    Her main field of action has been within the United Nations, but she has also been engaged several times with the private sector and civil societies organizations.

    Dorothy will be assisted by two young, female, brilliant mobile app developers: Martha Chumo from Nairobi, Kenya, and Patricia Duangcham from Bangkok, Thailand.

    Martha Chumo is a 19-year old developer who currently runs a Hacker School in her home-city of Nairobi, Kenya.

    "My vision for it is to have a three months programme where developers from Africa can come and learn new technologies and become world-class developers," says Chumo, adding that she's already found a space to host the aspiring programmers. "Not just doing small kinds of technology but getting Africa to get the new Google, the big technologies, these will be things to come from Africa."

    Patricia Duangcham is a computer animation student, who has developed several sustainable mobile applications. Currently working as an intern at Microsoft Thailand, Patricia is an award-winning, fully-qualified developer who formed her own Computer Club in Bangkok.

    The YouthMobile presentation will take place in Room 6 of the Fontenoy Building of UNESCO on 31 October 2013 from 9:30 a.m. to – 11 a.m. in French, and from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in English.

    The UNESCO Youth Forum takes place every two years. Since 1999 the Forum has served as a space for open and dynamic dialogue among young participants from all Member States of UNESCO to formulate strategic recommendations on UNESCO’s youth programmes.

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    28-10-2013

    UNESCO approves emergency funds for inventory of Mali’s intangible heritage

    The Bureau of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of Intangible Heritage, meeting at UNESCO’s Paris Headquarters, approved an emergency assistance package of $307,307 for the preparation of an inventory of the Mali’s intangible cultural heritage.

    The project will evaluate the state of intangible heritage (knowledge and practices related to nature, oral traditions, rituals, festivals and traditional crafts) in all parts of Mali, and will be carried out in two, year-long phases. The first  will cover the three northern regions (Gao, Kidal and Timbuktu), along with Mopti in the east-central region of Mali. These regions have suffered most directly from the recent armed conflict and occupation. The second phase will take in the rest of the country, including the four southern regions (Kayes, Koulikoro, Segou and Sikasso).

                The project also includes training workshops to strengthen capacities through training workshops in inventory techniques and intangible heritage management methods that will benefit 190 people. Finally, to raise public awareness  about intangible cultural heritage for inter community dialogue, two plays will be produced along with, a documentary film (in the Tamashek, Maure and Sonrhai languages) and a radio programme for local and regional broadcast.

                The Bureau’s decision, adopted today, encourages Mali to “implement the project in close cooperation with UNESCO and the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilisation Mission in Mali (MINUSMA, and with the widest possible participation of the communities concerned”.

     

                The Bureau also approved $25,000 for the safeguarding  in Vet Nam of indigenous knowledge linked to the environment of the Black Ha Nhi, an ethnic minority from the Lao Cai province.

    ****

    More information at: http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/index.php?lg=fr&pg=671

     

     

    Media Contact

    Lucia Iglesias Kuntz

    Tel: +33 1 4568 1702

    Country: 

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    28-10-2013

    A Day in the Life – catching up with the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus

    John Lennon Educational Tour Bus
    © UNESCO/Emilien Urbano
    Article type: 
    When, local time: 
    Monday, 28 October 2013 - 11:15am

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    28-10-2013

    A Day in the Life – catching up with the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus

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    28-10-2013

    A Day in the Life – catching up with the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus


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    28-10-2013

    Arabic Language Day 2013

    This text exists only in arabic.

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    28-10-2013

    Arabic Language Day 2013

    This text exists only in arabic.

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    25-10-2013

    UNESCO, ICANN and ISOC to launch development of Glossary on Internet Governance for Arabic speakers

    UNESCO, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) and the Internet Society (ISOC) are finalizing a framework to establish an Arabic glossary of Internet governance terms to support engagement in multistakeholder Internet governance processes by Arabic-speaking communities.

    Participation of all stakeholder and geographical communities is essential for a healthy and vibrant Internet ecosystem. Evidence shows that speakers of languages where Internet terminology does not exist tend to be increasingly disadvantaged in everyday conversation and professional settings, as well as in being able to participate actively in Internet governance processes.

    Internet governance sees a constant and rapid introduction of new terms and concepts. This new glossary will help ensure that Arabic-speakers have the necessary language tools to fully participate in and contribute to multistakeholder policy-making processes on various platforms, including the World Summit on Information Society (WSIS) and Internet Governance Forum (IGF).

    The partners in this project seek to provide methodological assistance to Arabic-speaking countries and communities – particularly national and regional professional organizations working in the field of language policy development and Internet governance. The project will be a collaborative process involving multiple stakeholders, and will also include a public consultation.

    As an open, inclusive and fully multistakeholder process, the next step will be a call for national and regional professional organizations in the field of language policies, experts on Internet governance issues and any other volunteer experts to join efforts and consult on the development of terms for the glossary.

    If you are interested to contribute to the implementation of this project, please send your expression of interest to Ms Irmgarda Kasinskaite-Buddeberg by email at: i.kasinskaite(at)unesco.org.

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    25-10-2013

    Science at the UNESCO Youth Forum

    © UNESCO

    Science, Technology and Innovation for Social Inclusion, Civic Engagement, Dialogue and Skills Development at the UNESCO Youth Forum

    The theme of the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum is “Youth and Social Inclusion: Civic Engagement, Dialogue and Skills Development” and it will be held from 29 to 31 October 2013 at UNESCO’s Headquarters in Paris. The forum gathers about 500 young women and men from around the world to exchange views, share experiences and identify solutions to the challenges they face.

    Science, Technology and Innovation are important pillars for social inclusion and can be used to promote dialogue and skills among the youth. This year’s Youth Forum will feature practical ways in which STI provides a number of new and emerging career, skills and entrepreneurial opportunities for the youth and equips young people with the skills necessary to be leaders, innovators and good citizens. Two capacity building sessions on natural science related issues will be organized; a) ‘Water cooperation: it’s your turn’ and, b) ‘Engineering in Action for Youth and young women; Hands-on Experiments in Engineering’. The importance of STI in facilitation social inclusion and dialogue was also reinforced by the STI related questions included in the online discussion. A number of Young Scientists and Innovators networks such as WFEO Youth Forum and South African Women in Engineering were mobilized to participate in the online discussion, register as observers and/or have stands to publicize their work at the forums. The Science Sector also recommended over 20 young scientists and innovators as possible speakers for the ‘15 minutes feature’ of which 5 youth innovators were selected to speak. Additionally, the science sector will have a stand at the ‘marketplace’ at the Forum which will display items about UNESCO’s work in the Natural Sciences.

    Water cooperation: it’s your turn!- An interactive session to learn about water issues and careers in water fields, 29 October 2013, 14:30 - 17:30, Room XI

    This capacity building session aims to reinforce the water-related capacities of youth by exploring the main issues affecting freshwater resources and the role of youth in resolving current and future challenges through cooperation. The session is organized within the context of the International Year of Water Cooperation and will focus on the skills needed for cooperation and professional opportunities for young people in the field of freshwater. The session will be facilitated by young professionals from different backgrounds who will share their experience and engage the participants in an interactive way. Youth from high schools will also share their experiences in water cooperation. The session includes practical exercises which focus on the development of skills in water cooperation.

    Engineering in Action for Youth and young women; Hands-on Experiments in Engineering, October 30, 2013, 10am-12pm, Room VI

    This session is organized in partnership with EWB UK, the World Federation of Engineering Organizations (WFEO) Youth Committee and SAWomeEng. It will be open to young women, and young men, who wish to participate in fun, hands-on engineering activities that will involve group work as well as building models and scenarios that influence life and choices of today. The workshop will involve activities like building a bridge, discussing fracking and solving a problem currently faced as well as other hands-on tasks. There will also be an open discussion on the involvement and role that youth particularly, young women play in the future of Science and Engineering with a view of getting ideas about how we can get more youth interested in careers in Science and Engineering. A part of the session will also be used to show the EPCA film “Science: Where can it take you” after which, participants can discuss issues explored in the film and propose solutions to address them. A film by Intel on girls in science will also be screened.

    The importance of technical skills for engineering cannot be argued, but often, softer skills such as presentation and pitching ideas and new concepts are often neglected, but an important part of the skills sets of engineers. A session on personal development and creating an elevator pitch for new ideas will be hosted to complement the technical nature of the workshop. The session will be facilitated by Emma Thompson, Engineers Without Borders UK (EWB UK) and Zainab Larabi, World Federation of Engineering Organizations (WFEO) Youth Committee Chair.

  • |
    25-10-2013

    Addressing online hate speech in South East European media

    © UNESCO

    Over 90 participants took part last week, 16 and 17 October, in the regional conference “Addressing online hate speech in South East Europe and Turkey: the role of media accountability mechanisms” organized by UNESCO in partnership with the South East European Network for Professionalization of Media (SEENPM) and the Sarajevo Media Centre. The event gathered international and national media experts, as well as journalists, academics and civil society representatives from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Turkey and Kosovo (as defined under UN Security Council Resolution 1244).

    Having examined the professional, legal and political conditions in which the media in the region work, conference participants confirmed that one of the greatest challenges facing media and policy makers is the growth of intolerance in online communication, which often turns into hate speech.

    The conference discussions underlined how the changing nature of journalism in the online environment and the participation of the audience in gathering and disseminating information have added new challenges for ethical journalism.

    Pointing to areas where efforts could be directed, participants stressed that laws pertaining to hate speech should be harmonized and clearly defined so that no one is penalized for the dissemination of hate speech unless it is shown that they published information with the intention of inciting discrimination, hostility or violence.

    Participants also called on media to agree on common standards and a common approach for dealing with hate speech, particularly concerning the moderation and management of user-generated content and online comments on journalistic work, which should involve reaching agreement on editorial guidelines and acceptable codes.

    Such codes should be followed up with self-regulatory mechanisms that ensure their implementation and should be tailored to meet the needs of a converged media environment with particular attention to online communications.

    Finally, participants highlighted the importance of investing in media and information literacy programmes for raising awareness at all levels of society, through the educational system and media, to encourage public responsibility in the use of information. Such programmes should also encourage media to engage with the audience in raising awareness of the dangers of intolerant and hateful speech, particularly in the online environment.

  • |
    25-10-2013

    18th SEAPAVAA Conference: Audiovisual Archives: Why They Matter

    © UNESCO

    Organized in cooperation with the Lao Department of Cinema, the 18th conference of South East Asia-Pacific Audio Visual Archive Association (SEAPAVAA) will explore and discuss the myriad of issues related to audiovisual archives on 26 and 27 May 2014 in Vientiane, Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

    The discussion will be constructed around a series of questions including, but not limited to:

    In what ways do AV archives matter? To whom and for whom do these archives matter? Do the importance and relevance of AV archives cross national boundaries? If AV archives matter, what must archivists do in terms of their advocacy and branding, engagement with stakeholders, community outreach, provision of access, appraisal, selection, acquisition, documentation and preservation? What resources, opportunities and inspirations are there for archivists to tap on and propel them to garner greater recognition for AV archives and the archiving profession? What challenges do archivists face in their endeavours? How are these challenges being addressed?

    The nature, purpose and potential use of AV archives, the cultural value and memories which these archives hold for nations and their peoples are generally recognized but not always properly appreciated. For a variety of reasons, AV archival institutions have not been particularly successful in making their work and themselves better known to their stakeholders and the general public, and the conference will seek to address these issues.

    SEAPAVAA has issued a Call for Papers from members and interested participants to express their views on these topics.

    UNESCO has been invited to deliver the keynote address during this important event. Its position is that AV archives are an integral part of documentary heritage and must be afforded equal protection. SEAPAVAA maintains formal relations with UNESCO and the conference is expected to contribute to better awareness of the Organization’s work in the region, its connection with global audiovisual archiving and the Memory of the World (MoW) Programme.

    SEAPAVAA is a member of the Co-ordinating Council of Audiovisual Archives Associations (CCAAA) which is a network of international non-governmental organizations involved in all aspects of audiovisual archiving including films, broadcast television and radio, and audio recordings of all kinds. CCAAA also manages the official website for the UNESCO World Day for Audiovisual Heritage celebrated annually on 27 October.

  • |
    25-10-2013

    Digital Heritage 2013: International Congress in Marseilles

    A large international congress on digital heritage will take place under the patronage of UNESCO, in Marseilles (France) from 28 October to 1 November 2013. Digital Heritage 2013 will bring together a wide range of stakeholders to discuss digital technology and how it relates to the protection, documentation and understanding of the shared heritage of humanity. The congress is open to all, and researchers, professionals in the cultural and digital heritage field, students and policy makers are especially welcome.

    The Congress will examine all forms of heritage, from the built (World Heritage), to cultural traditions and expressions (Intangible), museums and objects, and documentary heritage (Memory of the World).

    Archaeologists, architects, artists, historians, museologists, planners, conservationists, anthropologists, engineers, environmentalists, computer scientists, new media experts, film makers, and more will jointly explore the best of digital heritage. Over four days, parallel tracks will see presentations of best practices and innovative solutions, as well as panels, educational workshops, and policy debates. A public exhibition and video screening will also be organized.

    This congress represents a follow-up to the key initiative which UNESCO, and particularly the Communication and Information Sector, launched a year ago in Vancouver, Canada, in order to find solutions to the challenges affecting long-term and reliable access to digital heritage. In his remarks during the opening ceremony, Mr Jānis Kārkliņš, UNESCO’s Assistant Director-General for Communication and Information, spoke of his expectations from the Congress and of the need to ensure that digital heritage issues are placed on the global development agenda.

    Throughout the week, panelists and other speakers will propose their findings concerning knowledge management and preservation in order to obtain a better understanding of legal and technical issues relating to digital objects. The results of the Congress will provide the basis for the development of policy advice that can be made available to the governments of UNESCO Member States.

    Full details on the programme, the panel discussions, the exhibition as well as organizational details can be found on the Congress website. For further information please contact: info(at)digitalheritage2013.org.

  • |
    25-10-2013

    UNESCO promotes protection of journalists and other media actors in the digital age at the Internet Governance Forum

    © UNESCO

    Almost 100 participants from around the world debated the safety of online media actors at a workshop convened by UNESCO, Article 19 and CELE-UP (Center for Studies on Freedom of Expression and Access to Information, Universidad de Palermo) as part of the 8th Internet Governance Forum in Bali this week.

    UNESCO presented its preliminary exploration of a global research on online safety in a series of thematic areas ranging from illegitimate surveillance and digital attacks to a gender perspective, digital literacy and safety training.

    Panelists from Latin America and Indonesia assessed major challenges of protecting journalists and bloggers in their respective regions, pointing to problem of impunity for those who attacked journalists, new threats posed by digital technology, and the lack of awareness and training about digital literacy.

    “Bloggers should be protected as they face many challenges - licensing issues, protection of sources, accreditation, ethical responsibility - just like journalists, but no organization protects them,” was the message from Indonesian and other bloggers, who highlighted the contribution to public debate made by their output.

    Reference was made to the UN Human Rights Committee’s defining of journalism as “a function shared by a wide range of actors, including professional full-time reporters and analysts, as well as bloggers and others who engage in forms of self-publication in print, on the Internet or elsewhere”.

    Article 19 shared its recent policy brief on “The right to blog” which stated that the main protections that apply to journalists should apply to bloggers (including the right to protect sources, accreditation and guarantee of safety).

    Other speakers addressed complexities of the legal frameworks including criminal defamation cases and whether media self-regulatory bodies could incorporate bloggers who agreed to work by the relevant code of ethical standards.

    The session was chaired by Mr Guy Berger, UNESCO Director of Freedom of Expression and Media Development. He pointed to the relevance to online media actors of the UN Action Plan of Safety of Journalists and Issue of Impunity.

  • |
    24-10-2013

    Director-General deplores murder of radio chief Cláudio Moleiro de Souza in Brazil

    Irina Bokova, the Director-General of UNESCO, today denounced the murder of radio manager Cláudio Moleiro de Souza in Jaru, in the north of Brazil, on 12 October and called for an investigation into the crime..

    “I condemn the murder of Cláudio Moleiro de Souza,” the Director-General said. “ I trust the authorities will spare no effort in investigating this case, which is essential for the preservation of press freedom and the protection of journalists’ right to carry out their professional duties.”

    Cláudio Moleiro de Souza, manager of Rádio Meridional was shot by a lone gunman who entered the radio station and also shot at one of Souza’s colleagues, presenter Alberto Duran Duran, whose life is not in danger.

     

    Cláudio Moleiro de Souza is the sixth Brazilian media professional this year whose killing is recorded in the dedicated webpage UNESCO Condemns the Killing of Journalists.

                                                   ****

    Media contact: Sylvie Coudray, s.coudray(at)unesco.org,  +33 (0)1 45 68 42 12

    UNESCO is the United Nations agency with a mandate to defend freedom of expression and press freedom. Article 1 of its Constitution requires the Organization to “further universal respect for justice, for the rule of law and for the human rights and fundamental freedoms which are affirmed for the peoples of the world, without distinction of race, sex, language or religion, by the Charter of the United Nations.” To realize this the Organization is requested to “collaborate in the work of advancing the mutual knowledge and understanding of peoples, through all means of mass communication and to that end recommend such international agreements as may be necessary to promote the free flow of ideas by word and image…”

     

  • |
    24-10-2013

    More than 12 million adults are enrolled in literacy and adult education programmes in Latin America and the Caribbean

  • |
    24-10-2013

    Internationalized Domain Names still to reach full potential

    – Despite important advances more work is needed by all parties if Internationalized domain names are to foster the growth of multilingualism online, according to the 2013 EURid-UNESCO World Report on Internationalized Domain Names published today with the support of Verisign.

    The Report was presented at the Internet Governance Forum 2013 (IGF), in Bali, Indonesia, on 24 October.

    Internationalized domain names (IDNs) are those that include characters from non-Latin scripts, such as Cyrillic or Arabic.

    According to the Report only 2% of the world’s registered domain names are IDNs.  This slow uptake is in stark contrast to the burgeoning of multilingual online content.

    Improving usability in web-based email and services

    Most if not all IDN implementations underperform because of poor user awareness and experience, which lead to poor uptake.

    However, where IDNs are used, there is a 99% correlation between the language or script of the domain name and the language of associated website content, a clear indication that IDNs have a vital part to play in fostering a multilingual internet.

    "Languages are who we are,” stated Janis Karklins, UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Communication and Information in the Report’s Foreword.  “By protecting them, we protect ourselves; by promoting them, we sustain cultural diversity. This must be true also for cyberspace. To have maximum impact, to be sustainable and to be beneficial to all, cyberspace must be inclusive. Every woman and every man should be able to speak and write in their mother tongue, and this is why Internationalized Domains Names, IDNs, are so important.”

    The future of IDNs

    The launch of new IDN generic top level domains (gTLDs) in late 2013, early 2014, particularly the large number of top-level domains using Chinese characters, is expected to boost the market, providing an incentive for investors to update Internet infrastructure and improve user experience on popular web applications in order to access potentially valuable markets.  The new gTLDs may also help to raise end users’ awareness that domain names can be in languages other than English.

    The statistics presented in the 2013 EURid –UNESCO World Report are based on a data set of 228 million domain names. They include detailed information on how over one million IDNs from the .com, .net and .eu registers are used.  The report also includes case studies of the IDN country code Top Level Domain (ccTLDs such as .uk, .fr, or .es,) registry experiences from the People’s Republic of China, the Republic of Korea, Viet Nam, Egypt, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and the Russian Federation.

    Download the full report at www.eurid.eu.

    About .eu and EURid

    The .eu domain ranks among the largest top-level domains in the world, connecting 500 million people in 28 EU countries to one Internet identity. More than 3.5 million .eu names have been registered since the domain opened in 2005. Many companies and brands—including the likes of Fairtrade International, Foot Locker, Louis Vuitton, the MAN Group, Microsoft Corporation, Orangina and Toyota–use a .eu website as a practical way to express a clear European identity or  European marketing strategy..

    EURid is the not-for-profit organization that operates the .eu top-level domain, following a tender process and appointment by the European Commission. EURid works with over 750 accredited registrars and provides support in the 24 official EU languages. EURid is registered by the EU Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS), which is an expression of EURid’s environmental commitment. EURid has its headquarters in Brussels (Belgium), and regional offices in Pisa (Italy), Prague (the Czech Republic) and Stockholm (Sweden). More information at: http://www.eurid.eu.

                                                ****

    Media contact:s

    EURid

    Email: press(at)eurid.eu

    Press room: http://www.eurid.eu/en/press-room     

    UNESCO: Sue Williams

    Chief, Media Relations Section

    Division of Public Information UNESCO

    Phone: +33 (0) 1 45 68 17 06

  • |
    24-10-2013

    Open Access Campaign to mark Open Access week in Mexico

    © UNESCO

    UNESCO, Autonomous University of the State of Mexico (UAEM) and Redalyc have launched a campaign to celebrate the Open Access Week in Mexico. The campaign is launched under a concept developed in UAEM and is aptly titled “Open a 'Can-Do' attitude”.

    Launching the campaign, Dr Jorge Olvera-García, UAEM Rector, stated: “the campaign echoes the vision of Senator Ana Lilia Herrera to make Open Access a reality in Mexico and to make the accumulated knowledge available to each and everyone. We invite all to join this endeavour..."

    From 21 to 27 October, a series of distance as well as face-to-face lectures on Open Access will be organized in different parts of Mexico. This will involve setting up of billboards at strategic locations with an image to support the theme. This image is already being used in the UAEM official bulletins, radio and television spots, as well as in posters and postcards.

    The objective of the campaign is to encourage and invite universities and general public to join the Open Access movement and appreciate its benefits to the society. The campaign also utilizes social networks and provides the graphical options of “Open a 'Can-Do' Attitude”. Seven themes - one for every day of the week - have been developed to provide a concrete message on Open Access each day. The dissemination also utilizes other media such as university radio and television stations.

    For a decade, the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico is fostering Open Access with the Redalyc.org System of Scientific and scholarly communication. Since its creation, Redalyc is committed to give visibility to the scientific production generated in Ibero-American region. UAEM also hosted the First Discussion and Analysis Forum on Open Access to Knowledge, convened by the Senate of the Republic and spearheaded by Senator Anna Lilia Herera.

    UNESCO, through its Open Access Strategy, is backstopping the efforts spearheaded by the Senate Committee of Mexico with the support of CONACYT. UNESCO is supporting Open Access Policy Development efforts in Mexico to allow the easy flow of scientific knowledge by increasing its accessibility.

    Open Access is the immediate availability of works of scholars on the Internet for free - permitting any user to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of these articles, crawl them for indexing, pass them as data to software or use them for any other lawful purpose.

    All applications of the 2013 UNESCO-UAEM Open Access International Week can be downloaded at: http://www.uaemex.mx/acabaconlalata.

  • |
    23-10-2013

    Innovative drought monitoring project for sub-Saharan Africa featured in IFRC World Disasters Report 2013

    © UNESCO

    The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) released its annual World Disasters Report on 17 October 2013 focusing on how technology can directly reduce vulnerability and strengthen resilience against disasters. This year's report presents individuals and organizations that are actively engaged in relevant work towards disaster prevention. Among these, the report highlights two innovative UNESCO projects on Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR): the World Map of UNESCO's Points of Interest and a Drought monitoring and prediction project for sub-Saharan Africa.

    Drought is one of the leading impediments to development in Africa. Much of the continent is dependent on rain-fed agriculture, which makes it particularly susceptible to climate variability. Recurring drought conditions in many regions of Africa, most recently in eastern Africa, have had devastating humanitarian impacts and impose significant reductions in gross domestic product for countries whose economies are tied to agriculture. Climate change and population pressures make the prospect for continued drought impacts and water scarcity more worrisome. Alleviating the impacts of drought across sub-Saharan Africa requires a transition from crisis management to risk management and reduction, including developing national drought policies, increasing coping capacity and adapting to likely future changes at local levels.

    A key element in managing drought risk is the provision of early warning of developing drought conditions and impacts. Such information can provide governments with the lead-time necessary to implement drought management policies and reduce impacts at all levels. However obtaining the data needed to identify drought risks is challenging, especially in remote areas with unreliable monitoring networks and insufficient national capacity.

    In collaboration with the UNESCO, Princeton University has developed an experimental drought monitoring and forecast system for sub-Saharan Africa. The system merges climate predictions, hydrological models and remote sensing data to provide timely and useful information on drought in regions where institutional capacity is generally lacking and the access to information and technology prevents the development of systems locally. The system’s key elements are the provision of near real-time evaluations of the terrestrial water cycle and an assessment of drought conditions.

    A key element of the system’s development is the transition and testing of the technology for operational usage by African collaborators. In 2012, workshops were held in two regional centres – in Niger (for West African countries) and in Kenya (covering countries of the Greater Horn of Africa) – to train local scientists to run the system and interpret the data output. A third workshop will be held in southern Africa. Several challenges have been identified through ongoing discussion with African collaborators for the continued development and use of the system, which could become a key step forward in building capacity through technology and knowledge transfer. In particular, the application of hydrological and climate research into transferable technology with minimal overhead has been made possible and has the potential to reduce the impacts of drought across Africa.

    Related links:

  • |
    23-10-2013

    Intangible cultural heritage: A force for sustainable development

    © UNESCO
    When, local time: 
    Wednesday, 23 October 2013 - 4:15pm

  • |
    23-10-2013

    Financial Report & Audited Consolidated Financial Statements - 2012

  • |
    23-10-2013

    Bringing together the world’s youth at UNESCO, 29 – 31 October

    Youth from more than 150 countries, including well-known personalities and young leaders, will come together in Paris on 29 October to participate in the 8th Youth Forum of UNESCO, which will run until 31 October at the Organization’s Headquarters under the general theme of “Youth and Social Inclusion: Civic Engagement, Dialogue and Skills Development.”

    Over three days, participants at the 8thUNESCO Youth Forum will debate the challenges faced by young people on all continents, and review the main objectives of the Organization's youth programmes, to verify their relevance and enhance their effectiveness.

    They will be invited to make policy recommendations that will be submitted directly to the 195 Member States of UNESCO at the 37th General Conference of the Organization, which will open the following week (5-20 November).

    For the first time, participants will also be invited to identify 15 Action Projects (three per region), from amongst the 45 projects shortlisted by an international jury from replies to a call by UNESCO to youth organizations from around the world in July and August.

    The Forum will feature another important innovation: a more interactive format than in previous editions. Following proposals by the young people themselves, through online consultations conducted in early 2013, the Forum will last three days instead of four, and will focus on working sessions by regional and thematic groups, as well as direct exchanges.

    The Director-General of UNESCO, Irina Bokova, will open the Forum in the morning of 29 October and will award, at 6 p.m. on the same day, the first UNESCO / Juan Bosch Prize for the Promotion of Social Science Research in Latin America and the Caribbean to Karen Nathalia Ceron Steevens, a 25-year-old Colombian sociologist, for her work on the prevention of youth violence in Central America.

    Numerous side events will be held throughout the three days of the Forum, both at UNESCO and outside.

    Furthermore, in cooperation with the International Music Council, one of UNESCO’s partner NGOs, the “John Lennon Tour Bus 2013”, is stopping in Paris since 22 October until the end of the Youth Forum, right outside the main entrance of UNESCO Headquarters, Place de Fontenoy.

                                                               ****

    Journalists wishing to cover the Forum should request accreditation from

    Isabelle Le-Fournis, UNESCO Press Service, +33 (0) 1 45 68 17 48 i.le-fournis(at)unesco.org

  • |
    23-10-2013

    Honduras ratifies the Convention against Discrimination in Education

    In September 2013, Honduras became the hundredth State party to the Convention against discrimination in Education.
    This instrument, as well as the Recommendation against discrimination in education, which celebrated their fiftieth anniversary in 2010, express the fundamental principles of non-discrimination and equality of educational opportunities. As such, they cover the right to education in its various dimensions.
    The Convention and Recommendation reflect UNESCO’s mission to promote and support collaboration among nations to “advance the ideal of equality of educational opportunities without regard to race, sex or any distinctions, economic or social.”
    The Convention will enter into force with respect to Honduras in December.

    In September 2013, Honduras became the hundredth State party to the Convention against discrimination in Education.

    This instrument, as well as the Recommendation against discrimination in education, which celebrated their fiftieth anniversary in 2010, express the fundamental principles of non-discrimination and equality of educational opportunities. As such, they cover the right to education in its various dimensions.

    The Convention and Recommendation reflect UNESCO’s mission to promote and support collaboration among nations to “advance the ideal of equality of educational opportunities without regard to race, sex or any distinctions, economic or social.

    The Convention will enter into force with respect to Honduras in December.

  • |
    23-10-2013

    Combating discrimination in education

    UNESCO’s Executive Board examined the results of the 8th Consultation of member states on the measures taken to implement the UNESCO Convention and Recommendation against Discrimination in Education.
    Launched in 2011, the Consultation involved 58 member states and was conducted in line with the guidelines for the preparation of periodic state reports submitted every four years to UNESCO.
    The objective is to illustrate the actions taken to implement the Convention and Recommendation, take stock of progress and identify the difficulties within countries.
    The Report is available online: AR | EN | FR | ES | CH | RUAn extensive Report on the results of this Consultation is also available: AR | EN | FR | ES | CH | RUUNESCO webpage dedicated to the 8th ConsultationReporting guidelines

    UNESCO’s Executive Board  examined the results of the 8th Consultation of member states on the measures taken to implement the UNESCO Convention and Recommendation against Discrimination in Education.

    Launched in 2011, the Consultation involved 58 member states and was conducted in line with the guidelines for the preparation of periodic state reports submitted every four years to UNESCO.

    The objective is to illustrate the actions taken to implement the Convention and Recommendation, take stock of progress and identify the difficulties within countries.

  • |Norden
    01-02-2013

    Alfarådet - Verksamhetsplan 2014

    Virksomhetsplan for Nordisk alfaråd 2014
    Målgruppe for det nordiske alfaråd er voksne med kort eller ingen skolegang som ikke har noen av de nordiske språk som morsmål.

  • |
    08-10-2012

    Nordisk konferens 2012 - Den profesjonelle alfabetiseringslæreren

    19.-21. september 2012, Sandefjord Park Hotell
    Alfabetiseringskonferansen er et ledd i det nordiske alfaråds arbeid og er knyttet til formålsparagrafen for rådet og til de styringsdokumentene som hvert år urarbeides i tilknytning til den overordnede virksomhetsplan for  NVL.

  • |
    04-10-2012

    Nordisk konferens 2012 - tabeller

    Nordisk konferens 2012 - tabeller

  • |
    07-10-2010

    Nordisk konferens 2010

    Nordisk konferens 2010

  • |
    04-08-2009

    Formål/syfte

    Formål/syfte

  • |
    09-12-2008

    Nordiska alfabetiserings-konferenser

    Nordiska alfabetiserings-konferenser

  • |
    03-11-2008

    Lenker

    Lenker

  • |
    03-11-2008

    Læringsressurser

    Læringsressurser

  • forskning |
    03-11-2008

    Forskning/artikler

    Ett angeläget område för Alfarådet är att få kunskap om den nordiska forskningen rörande vuxnas alfabetisering och lågutbildades utbildningssituation. Alfarådet har via ett utskick till universitet och högskolor, gjort en första inventering av vetenskapliga arbeten inom detta område.

  • |
    03-11-2008

    Tidligere årsplaner og konferanser

    Tidligere årsplaner og konferanser

  • |
    03-11-2008

    Medlemmar

    Medlemmar

  • baskunskaper läs- och skrivkunnighet |Norden
    03-11-2007

    Kartlegning av alfabetisering i Norden

    Kartläggning av alfabetisering i Norden (KAN) är, som namnet visar, en nordisk kartläggning av utbildningssituationen för studerande som inte har något av de nordiska språken som sitt modersmål och som dessutom är helt utan eller har mycket kort formell skolutbildning.

  • |
    30-08-2007

    Alfarådet

    Alfarådet